behavior of concern

A few days ago, I had the opportunity to discuss “Understanding Challenging Behaviour” with a number of professionals involved (or about to be involved) in dementia caregiving.

It got me thinking 🙂

There is, of course, no shortage of difficult/ challenging behavior when you are caring for a dementia patient. The nature of the disease keeps the patient disoriented about time and space, keeps memories disjointed or wrongly connected, affects even basic aspects like identity and interpreting the surroundings. A patient may not recognize a close relative, let alone a carer he/ she sees every day. Everything to a patient can be a challenge, and in response to this, the patient may react with withdrawal or aggression or any of the range of ‘challenging’ behaviors.

Then, there is this concept of  “behavior of concern” which is rather simple:  not every strange/ not-normal behavior of a dementia patient needs to worry us. Every model on dementia caregiving tells us we need to focus on behaviors with serious/ unacceptable consequences. Simply put, a behavior of concern is one that upsets or harms the patient or the persons (or community) around the patient. The rest of strange behaviors can, well, be set aside 🙂
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