Dementia day care centres: criteria caregivers use to avail such facilities

I’ve often bemoaned the fact that we have very few dementia-specific facilities in India, but it’s probably time to write about the flip side of the problem: that some dementia day care centres remain underutilized and volunteers from such centres say they don’t understand why families hesitate to use day care facilities.

Before I continue, in case you are unsure what a dementia day care facility in India may be like, here are some interviews I did a couple of years ago (the information may be different for other centres and may have changed even for the centre these interviews refer to): Care in a dementia day care centre: a social worker explains and Taking dementia patients for outings: a volunteer shares his experience.

I’m writing this post to gather input from caregivers in India about their thoughts on using dementia day care centre facilities for the persons they are caring for. My questions: What criteria have you used/ could you use to decide whether or not to use a dementia day care centre? What are the pros and cons as you see them? How would you evaluate a centre, or its suitability for the person you look after? Would the location matter? Would transport matter? What sort of facilities do you expect in the facility? What sort of things there would make you so uncomfortable that you won’t think of using it? how would you decide whether the facility would suit the person with dementia? What sort of payment would seem reasonable to you? Are there other factors (like comments by family/ neighbors, etc.) that may affect your decision?

And, at a more basic level, do you think a dementia day care centre can add any value to you and/ or the person with dementia who you care for?

(Of course, if you have used a day care and have comments on what helped and what didn’t, that would be great to know, too)

I must admit here that I did not use a day care facility for my mother; my decision was based on my mother’s needs and personality and not so much related to the facility I evaluated. On the other hand, I know families that have been very happy using day care centres. I also know families that withdrew the person after a while, for various reasons. I’ll probably write more about these in a later post; right now, I would like to gather more information from other caregivers on their opinions and thoughts about day care facilities.

We need to share thoughts and data on this because we want dementia-specific facilities. If we want day care centres, but existing centres are not good enough, our data may help improve existing services or set up more suitable ones. And even if the services we want are different (like respite care or caregiver training or supply of trained attendants), we must remember that if entrepreneurs get discouraged by the response to their day care centre, they may decide against offering other services which we want.

Looking forward to your comments (Remember, you can post anonymously. You can also write directly to me).

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Adventures in Hindi Part 1: A mother-tongue fading behind a veil

For the past few months, I’ve found myself exploring language, specifically Hindi, in an office-chair adventure. What started me off were some stray comments and even more stray thoughts, and then the subject grew like Frankenstein’s creation as I obsessed with how Hindi is (or is not yet) used by various people on the Internet, in life, and so on. I hit blocks repeatedly as I couldn’t locate enough on the topic to satiate my craving for knowledge.

This post is the first post of a four-post entry, and while this series describe my “adventures” with Hindi, I suspect that my experiences would hold good other Indian languages.

But before I start, a warning. I’m not someone into culture and language and preserving stuff like that. To me, culture and language evolve with people and times, and while there is surely merit in preserving literature and nuances of less-spoken languages, I’m not involved in that. My concern with language–any language–is only to the extent that one person can speak or write it and another understand or read it.

What got me into this avenue of exploration was some volunteer work, culminating in an incident that made me feel I was a character in a comic strip, and the joke was on me. And a desire to break out of that comic strip.

Some background first.

Hindi is my mother tongue, the language my mother spoke from her childhood and also studied in till she switched over to English in college. But Hindi was not my first language; my mother wanted me to be fluent in English and pointed out that I’d anyway pick up Hindi from people around me, so why not give me a good foundation in English instead?

Read the full post here