A sense of loss

Losing a memory is horrible; it is as if a part of oneself is lost, because ultimately, our sense of identity is an integration of all the memories and thoughts we hold close to us.

It is also horrible to find oneself wanting to remember something, and not being able to, and not having anyone who can help us fill up the gap. And I am not only talking of what a person suffering from dementia feels; we all have experienced this some time or the other. Perhaps that is why we like to have around us, for at least some of the time, people with whom we have “shared memories”.

This fact came home to me some months after my father died. I was on my evening walk, and suddenly remembered an incident of the past, but could not remember some of the details. It’s okay, I thought, I’ll go home and ask my father. Then I remembered that my father was dead.
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beyond acceptance in caregiving–the journey through unknown territories

When I was twelve, a palm-reader told me most authoritatively that I would travel extensively through unknown lands after I crossed the age of forty. I believed him, especially when an expert astrologer said much the same thing based on my janampatri (birth-chart). Then, at forty, when I should have been planning my world tours, I got drawn into caregiving, and I said, well, so much so for all those predictions 🙂

Looking back, though, caregiving has been a journey through unknown lands, albeit of the internal kind and not quite the sort I expected. Like any adventure, it has involved unexpected situations and needed creativity and improvisations, and below I am sharing some of the landscapes I have viewed…

The landscape of parents, seen as a fellow-adult -Too many of my friends and colleagues stay ambivalent in their attitude towards their parents. Some dislike them, even hate them, and never get the time (or energy or will) to resolve this in time–it rankles inside them for years, and sometimes becomes a core that is so heavily shielded they don’t venture anywhere near it.  They react to their parents as if they were still children being imposed on, and move away physically/ emotionally as soon as possible, staying distant. The discomfort is palpable.
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