A nuclear family sans elders, blissful ignorance about ageing and elders, rude awakenings

While I continue mulling about ageing, here’s a confession about my blissful ignorance about ageing and dying as I grew up in a nuclear family, just my parents and I, and then moved over to my own nuclear family with my parents nearby. Truth is, right till I was almost forty years old, I never spared a deep-enough thought towards ageing or death. Not that I imagined that people lived forever. I knew people died, I even knew they got frail and dependent and fell ill, often more so if they were older, but I never thought of how it impacted them or their families and all that.

I’ve learnt stuff since then, though 😦

My mother’s parents died when she was very young, as did my father’s mother; my father’s father (whom I called Baba) lived with his stepdaughter in Delhi because my father was on postings outside Delhi. Baba would visit us for a few weeks every year, a frail man who carried a cloth bag full of Urdu and Persian books when he went out for long walks. He did not have anything much to say to me. For those few weeks when he was visiting, home would seem somewhat different, but not by much. He was in good health, and except for his habit of smoking the hookah, there was no oddity of his that I noticed too much.

When my father finally got posted to Delhi, I remember this discussion on whether Baba would want to move in with us, but Baba wanted to stay in Delhi 6 with his cronies nearby. My contact with him was this once-a-month visit when my mother would drive down to Turkman Gate with me, and Baba would come to our parked car by rickshaw and she would drive him home for lunch with us, and a few hours later, he would be dropped back and all would be normal again for him and for us. Then he started falling ill, and his visits reduced, and then he fell more ill, and there was talk of whether he should now be looked after by his one and only son, my father. Read the full post here