Dementia prevalence, life expectancy, population pyramids, and playing around with graphs and scattered numbers; also, some sundry thoughts

I recently chanced on a newspaper article lauding Bollywood for spreading awareness on “rare” diseases, lumping in this so-called “rare” category genuinely rare diseases like progeria with widely prevalent problems like Alzheimer’s Disease. And I thought, maybe this reporter did not know about Alzheimer’s before watching “Black”, but surely we cannot call a disease rare just because we may not have heard of it!

See, poor awareness about a disease/ syndrome is not the same as low prevalence. A disease may be occurring often and remaining undiagnosed, or perhaps people do not talk about the diagnosis because there is a stigma attached to it; that does not make the disease “rare”, though awareness definitely needs to be spread.

There’s a tragedy happening when a commonly prevalent disease remains undiagnosed because of poor awareness. We add to that tragedy if we call the disease rare, because to call it “rare” diminishes alertness about a disease. Most of us may read an article on a rare disease with curiosity, but assume it is exotic and only something very few get (always “others”, never we or our close ones). Labeling something rare seems (to me) counterproductive to awareness drives.

The newspaper report I mention above started me in a rather disjointed gathering of diverse data and numbers that I have not yet managed to organize mentally, but hey, this is a blog, not a paper, so here goes…

Let’s first knock off the bundling of progeria and Alzheimer’s into one group. Wikipedia’s page on progeria informs me that there are 80 cases worldwide for progeria (1 per 8 million live births). On the other hand, the WHO and ADI report of 2012 (Dementia: A Public Health Priority) estimates dementia cases worldwide as 35.6 million (35,600,000) which is 0.5% of the world population, and most of these cases are either pure Alzheimer’s or mixed dementias (that include Alzheimer’s).

Also, on what is “rare” as a disease, here are some definitions (from this site )

  • A disease or disorder is defined as rare in Europe when it affects fewer than 1 in 2000.
  • A disease or disorder is defined as rare in the USA when it affects fewer than 200,000 Americans at any given time.

I hope that finishes off my explanation of the error in using the “rare” label for dementia or Alzheimer’s.

Onwards, then, to other thoughts on numbers and stuff.

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