Silver linings, budding seniority, dyeing choices

I must admit that part of my week’s obsession with ageing problems and support is that in the month of December I was called a senior citizen twice. I am a number of years short of that landmark, and the comment made me bristle, not just because it bumped up my age (something which even an elder-respecting society does not consider a compliment) but also because of the attitude with which those words were said…sort of, all is over for you, Ma’am, and so anything you do is unexpected and like a miracle. It was so dismissive and patronizing that it bugged me.

It made me wonder how I’d feel once I did cross the age of 60 and heard the word applied to me in that tone, knowing that the appellation was factually correct. Anyway, why should a particular age matter so much, and why should it be such a way of judging people? Are the Govt concessions connected with the age worth that aura?

I have, of course, only myself to blame for being taken as a senior citizen before I have reached that “silver” age threshold.

For one, I am not dead. If I had died when younger, I would have died wrinkle-free and black-haired, without having the word “senior” applied to me.

But, you know, I would rather be alive and senior, than dead and young.

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Active, visible elders, and inactive, tucked away, hidden elders

This is about some thoughts triggered by a senior citizen event I attended, where the hall was full of articulate, well-dressed, energetic elders (some came with younger relatives), all animated and social. My first response was a general happiness, but that feeling was short-lived as I was swept away almost immediately by a tremendous surge of loss because I thought of my mother, who had been such an intelligent and energetic person, and I wondered how our lives would have been if she had not developed dementia. Some weeks have passed since that function, and I have had time to mull over that experience and my response to it…

As I shared with some online caregiver friends immediately after that incident, I was so swept away by the sense of loss that day that tears prickled my eyes and I had to blink them away. I could not concentrate on watching those senior citizens accept prizes and sing and all that; I could only think of my mother and the past several years. I remembered how she (as my re-examination of past clues shows) had started experiencing the dementia gaps and setback well before the diagnosis, and had started withdrawing, hiding, covering up, raging, suspecting she was going crazy and therefore blaming everyone….trying to view those years as they would have been for her was terrifying.

I left the function early and could not get rid of that horrible pit in my stomach for a few days. I thought I could then understand why so many people have problems understanding that my mother’s problems are genuine; they have seen “normal” ageing, and want to think everyone ages that way, and I wished I could slip back into that comfort of normality but alas…

The sadness I felt for was not just for my mother, it was also for myself, and for everyone who experiences this loss as patients, as family….

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