Newspaper Coverage of Dementia in India: An Exploratory Analysis (Part 2)

This blog post is part 2 of a two-part series on newspaper coverage of dementia in India. ((read part 1 here)

Background: I had undertaken an exploratory study of the dementia/ Alzheimer coverage in the top Hindi and English newspapers to see how existing coverage may contribute to awareness/ support. In part 1, I documented my selection of newspapers how I gathered articles, and some initial analysis based on quantities (read part 1 here). In this post, part 2, I share my content analysis and suggestions.

Topics of this blog post:

Approach to assessing a published piece

For my content analysis, the reader profiles and the possible desirable outcomes I considered were:

  • The (uninterested) general public: Typically persons who know nothing or very little about dementia. They may have seen persons with dementia symptoms, but and are not looking actively looking for information, and may not find the information useful. Desirable outcomes for this profile are increased alertness towards symptoms, better diagnosis-seeking behavior, and more supportive attitudes towards families living with dementia.
  • The solution-seekers: These are persons who are concerned about dementia, typically because they or someone close to them has dementia. They are likely to read anything connected with dementia and will probably notice the word even if it is buried deep in an article. Desirable outcomes for these persons are better ability to live with and support dementia, reduced stress, reduced sense of isolation, and more willingness to share their experiences.

For the analysis, I looked at the full set of articles using two different perspectives.

  • The various types of articles, the proportion in which these types appeared, and their typical coverage of dementia.
  • The aspects relevant for spreading dementia awareness and information in the public, and checking how effective the existing coverage was with respect to each such aspect.

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Perspective 1: Article types found, the relative proportions, and the way they cover dementia

Types of articles mentioning dementia :

Hindi English
Wellness/ study reports 142 (61%) 185 (44%)
Event related articles 32 (14%) 40 (10%)
News articles mentioning dementia 24 (10%) 150 (36%)
General articles 33 (14%) 34 (8%)
Others 3 (1%) 10 (2%)
Total 234 articles (3 newspapers, all years)(100%) 419 articles (3 newspapers, only 2015) (100%)

Articles related to wellness/ health/ miracle-advance in medicine/ research studies: This was the largest category of articles, both in Hindi and in English. The percentage of articles in this category was higher in Hindi than in English (61% compared to 44%) as shown in the table alongside. Most of these contained only the words dementia/ Alzheimer’s or a small phrase about them, mainly focusing on memory loss. Some had sensational, confusing, or misleading titles or content. A few contained a bit more detail, but often these were complicated and buried.

Announcements/ reports of events and inaugurations around Alzheimer’s, or some related field (e.g., geriatrics). These typically related to World Alzheimer’s Day functions, conferences, release of reports, and were mostly in the months of September/ October. These formed 10-14% of the articles in both Hindi and English (see table). Article scope was often a mix of things such as names of experts, event venue and topics talked about, dementia statistics, etc. Some also included layperson-friendly information on dementia symptoms, risks, and the diagnosis process.

Current news articles that contained some mention of dementia. These were an assortment of celebrity news, crime news where some party had (or claimed to have) dementia, drug company news, business news, reviews and award announcements for movies, books, etc. The Hindi newspapers had a far lower percentage of articles in this category (around 10%) compared to the English newspapers, where they were a significant 36% of the total. Most such articles only contained the words (dementia or Alzheimer) or the standard phrase on ‘memory loss’.

General articles that mentioned dementia. These included personal essays, or special health features. They formed around 8-14% of the total coverage (see table). Many of them gave at least some useful information on dementia or care, and some were very useful.

Other articles that mentioned “dementia” and “Alzheimer”. These included many where these words were used as part of normal language to connote forgetfulness/ unacceptable behavior, etc. Some of these mocked politicians or complained about systems or used the words to joke. They formed around 1-2% of the total coverage in both Hindi and English.

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Perspective 2: Content effectiveness for each aspect relevant for awareness/ information

Establishing familiarity with dementia/ Alzheimer as a serious medical condition

Current newspaper coverage is encouraging in terms of basic exposure to the words, both in Hindi and English. “Dementia “and “Alzheimer” seem to have become part of lists used in wellness articles along with other serious conditions (diabetes, cancer, etc.).

Studies on dementia are being reported, too (though far less in Hindi than in English).

Exposure/ familiarity are a good foundation for an awareness drive. However, they work only if the usage is positive and if these are supplemented with availability of enough reliable and usable information.

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Information conveyed regarding salient characteristics of dementia

Around 73% of the articles only contained the word dementia (or Alzheimer) or used the context or a shorthand phrase/ context to imply one aspect of dementia.

In the Hindi pieces, the most emphasized aspect was forgetting. Other phrases indicated age-related illness and mental illness. Typical phrases were: भूलने की बीमारी, स्मृति लोप, याददाश्त की कमजोरी, स्मरणशक्ति की समस्या, बढ़ती उम्र की समस्या, दिमागी बीमारी, मानसिक बीमारी. A scant few articles mentioned brain and cognition, often using rather Sanskritized Hindi: संज्ञानात्मक (ज्ञान संबंधी) गिरावट, मानसिक क्षमता ह्रास, बोध क्षमता, संज्ञान से जुड़ा विकार, मस्तिष्क का क्षय.

Anecdotally: I asked some middle class persons what they understood by some phrases (संज्ञान , मानसिक क्षमता ह्रास, cognitive impairment, neurodegenerative disease). Many had no idea of the meaning. None of them could come up with examples of behavior changes they would be alert about. I queried about “memory loss”, and almost everyone told me they suffered from it. Misplaced keys, forgotten activities, and forgotten names of people and movies were quoted as proof.

English newspaper coverage also mainly mentioned memory loss, age-related, and mental-illness, but other phrases were fairly common, too, such as: cognitive decline, cognitive impairment, neurodegenerative disease, etc.

All in all, these one-phrase depictions don’t inform laypersons what to be alert about, or how dementia/ AD symptoms may be similar to or different from old age. Terms like memory loss and old age are too all-encompassing for practical use.

On a related note: In both English and Hindi, this over-identification with forgetfulness has some very unfortunate implications because of the tendency of people to use it to mock/stigmatize. More on this later.

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Information conveyed on dementia basics


Newspapers: a common morning sight at any shop

While many articles talked of the need to avoid getting dementia, or suggested superfoods or healthy living/ active ageing for this, they did not explain dementia symptoms, duration, progression, and challenge clearly enough or explain why it was considered serious.

  • Of the articles studied, only around 6% explained some of the dementia symptoms in friendly, understandable ways that I considered helpful to laypersons.
  • Many aspects of dementia were neglected in almost all articles, such as the duration, progressive nature, the changed and difficult behavior, increased dependence, reduced mobility, possibility of early onset, possibility of initial symptoms other than memory loss, etc.

As pointed out earlier, the “memory loss” aspect was repeatedly emphasized. This, along with missing or minimal mention of other symptoms, resulted in very unrealistic depictions.

For example, some articles said things like “a person may even forget the names of family members” as if that was the worst that could happen, and ignored problems like persons not being able to do even simple tasks, incontinence, inability to swallow, etc.

Seriousness of dementia was conveyed using terms like “debilitating” condition, “battle”, “throes of dementia”, “afflicted” and “suffer”, but these terms, in the absence of explanations and examples, do not increase the readers’ understanding or appreciation of the difficulties of dementia.

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Information conveyed on dementia prevention/ treatment

While articles with wellness advice and general interviews with doctors included some useful tips for reducing risk, and also discussed treatment, they were also sometimes misleading in big ways and small.

  • Wellness type articles were sometimes somber and useful; others carried exaggerated claims, usually about a superfood/ super-remedy. As articles on superfoods keep getting published, this may not be a problem, as people are used to reading such claims in articles with titles like “20 uses of .”
  • Misleading presentations of study reports are more problematic. Articles often presented the result of a single study as if talking about a well-tested cure or an established medical fact.
    • Sensational headings were common and tended to be simplistic and misleading. Even if the article text was balanced, the title’s dramatic impression could linger.
    • In Hindi newspapers, many of the translated research-related articles were heavily abbreviated; they did not include the disclaimers and nuances present in the English equivalents, and hence can confuse/ mislead.
    • Some study reports were useful; they reminded us to adopt healthier lifestyles.
  • Interviews of experts (doctors, nutritionists, others) for health/ active ageing, or specific interviews for dementia.
    • Some such articles combined medical information from a doctor with non-medical advice (such as claims regarding superfoods/ herbs); combining the two in one article may be seen as approval by the expert quoted elsewhere in the article.
    • Some experts were quoted as saying that following their advice will “prevent” dementia. To most laypersons, “prevention” means never getting the disease.
    • Sometimes articles claimed (and even quote experts) that treatment will stop the disease or cure it. This could make people think dementia can be reversed.

In summary, some articles contained useful information on risk, treatment, diagnosis, but many of them also included misleading information. In articles quoting experts/ doctors, such misleading/ wrongly quoted tidbits are more believable, and hence more harmful.

Unfortunately, there were almost no articles that explicitly busted myths or squashed misleading claims or clearly and firmly corrected the misquoted expert-speak.

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Information conveyed on dementia prevalence

People take a condition more seriously if they know others with it, and can see how tough it is to cope with.

One way this sense of closeness/ immediacy is reinforced is through news items that mention that someone has dementia (a celebrity or someone else). News about creative works (movies, books, plays, etc.) that include a character with dementia also help. Even a single-word mention ( had dementia) makes dementia more “real.”

  • Articles in this category: Just 22 (around 9%) in Hindi fell in this category; there were many more (137 articles, around 33%) in English. This could be because the persons reported about in Hindi newspapers are not of the profile that admits to having dementia, or the creative works of interest to Hindi readers do not depict someone with dementia.

The possibility and challenges of dementia also hit harder through articles where families/ acquaintances describe their personal dementia-related experiences.

  • Articles in this category: I found fewer than 5 Hindi articles that presented real-life care situations (this is too low to even consider what the proportion is). The number was better in English– 30 articles, (around 7%). Such articles often involve locating and interviewing families, which means more effort. Hindi lags behind English in this.
  • Many personal stories were featured in city supplements of newspapers, not in the main newspaper, and were available only in some cities, limiting their visibility.

Prevalence is sometimes conveyed using statistics. Such mentions were often associated with event reports, and more visible in English newspapers. However, most readers don’t remember population and ageing numbers. They do not mentally convert national prevalence figures into an understanding of how prevalent dementia was in terms of people around them. These are just large numbers, and they don’t even remember the units of the numbers after some time (was it a lakh? a million? a crore?). I, therefore, do not consider such coverage effective in conveying (at an emotional level) that real people–we and those around us–can also get dementia and face major challenges.

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Information conveyed on dementia caregiving

Mention of caregiving in dementia articles, if present, was usually perfunctory and confined to platitude-filled sentences. (“They need love and care.”). Some articles included general advice on care or some tips/ comments by experts. Another source of care information was articles where people share personal stories or when a news item describes challenges that families faced because of coping with dementia.

  • Articles in this category: Around 14 (around 6%) in Hindi, and somewhat better in number/ proportion at 56 articles (around 13%) in English.
  • Even articles that carried some care-related information/ experiences did not provide a comprehensive view of care. They usually ignored aspects like the extent and type of care, and how to prepare for it. They did not mention counselling, training on care skills, resources, etc. Even collectively, they did not have enough detail for caregivers to appreciate the range of care-related work that needs to be planned for and done, and how to proceed.

The much lower coverage of the care aspect means readers don’t think about how dementia may impact the family. Seen along with other coverage gaps, newspaper coverage ends up depicting dementia as some sort of memory loss problem that can be stopped or removed using medicines and love.

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Negative factors in information conveyed–stigma/ mocking

Unfortunately, the close association established between dementia/ Alzheimer with forgetting/ confusion and with mental illness has resulted in the words being used in normal language while depicting confusion and forgetfulness.

Here, for example, are some phrases from essays on utterly unrelated topics: “When the establishment is going senile, it feels everyone else has Alzheimer’s.” or “If you have been lucky to encounter such an odd creature, what do you think is wrong with him? Senile dementia?”

Worse, dementia and Alzheimer are used to mock people, especially politicians. In one instance, some workers of one party sent Alzheimer pills to a senior leader of another party as a “unique” protest. Jokes and accusations are increasingly made about politicians having Alzheimer’s. Such pieces seem more interesting than staid interviews and fact-filled articles, and get shared and liked on social media. This usage is damaging and difficult to stop.

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Overall usefulness of articles

Many articles containing the word dementia/ Alzheimer had only the words or a phrase or so. Some had a bit more, but often not in a usable, friendly way. I consider an article useful if it gives usable information on dementia and care to laypersons without stigma, and contains a good amount of information or at least conveys one important aspect very well, and where the misleading tidbits are relatively low. My subjective assessment, summarized:

  • Both in Hindi and English, only around 9% of the articles were reasonably useful for laypersons to learn about dementia and care. However, the quality of usefulness was somewhat higher in the English articles.
  • Many articles, including useful ones, contained a least some misleading/ confusing information. I tried to locate articles where the confusing/ misleading element seemed serious enough to (in my opinion) increase the chance of harmful beliefs or decisions. I categorized 15 Hindi articles (around 6%) and 12 English articles (around 3%) as harmfully misleading. Also, some articles directly stigmatized dementia. I found 4 Hindi articles and 10 English articles in this category.
  • Note, too, that the quantity of articles in Hindi is much lower. Considering the overall picture, we have roughly 2-3 reasonably useful articles per year per newspaper in Hindi, and around 12-14 reasonably useful articles per year per newspaper in English. None of these useful articles provided comprehensive coverage. Put together, too, the total coverage misses many important aspects of dementia and care.
  • On the whole, the quality and scope of coverage of the useful English articles was better than that of the useful Hindi articles, and the misleading tidbits based on studies were fewer in English. English articles also did a better coverage of the care aspect and had more coverage that could make dementia seem more real to readers. But stigmatizing usage of the word was high.

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The daily newspaper, part of the morning ‘chai’ routine

Suggestions to improve the situation

Stop the chances of a negative information loop . Counter misleading information, debunk myths, and condemn use of dementia/ Alzheimer to mock others. Talk and write about this, and build up public opinion against such stigmatizing. Stop the tendency to mock/ stigmatize before it reaches the levels it has reached in other countries because once it sets in, it is extremely difficult to correct.

Improve the overall quality and quantity of coverage in all newspapers. Some things to consider:

  • Use every event and occasion to disseminate usable information about dementia and care in simple, understandable language.
  • When talking of dementia, take care to also convey the serious aspects of dementia and care, not just “memory loss” or initial symptoms. Talk about challenging behaviors, late stage dependency, the duration of dementia, progression, etc. Use examples and simple language.
  • Take active steps to avoid being misquoted or quoted out of context. Often reporters, because they do not understand dementia well enough, miss nuances and hence inadvertently mislead readers because of the way they frame a sentence or select sentences from a larger interview. Make the reporters’ job easier and less prone to error.
    • Provide reporters material they can directly use in sidebars and as explanations.
    • Provide reporters press-releases of events
    • For expert interviews, opt for e-interviews and ask that you be quoted verbatim, and that if any paraphrasing is done, it should be validated with you. In some cases, reporters may even agree to show you the section of the article draft pertaining to your interview, especially if the interview is a long, informal phone chat and the article is not being rushed because of a deadline.
  • Improve visibility for family experiences of living with dementia/ supporting dementia. Talk about the critical role of care, the planning and work it requires, and the support available. Help reporters locate and contact potential caregiver interviewees.
  • Some reporters/ writers have a family member with dementia. Encourage them to write general articles and help them do a good job.
  • In general, try to get useful coverage throughout the year, including coverage in the main sections of the paper and not just city supplements.

Additionally, find ways to get useful visibility for dementia in non-English newspapers. This is where bulk of the readership is. Understand how such newspapers select topics and articles, and use this to get more visibility and to spread awareness and information effectively. Some things to consider:

  • Develop terminology in Indian languages that is easy to understand, non-stigmatizing, and yet does not water down the seriousness of the problems faced in dementia. That way, reporters will have a set of words/ phrases to use and will not end up using stigmatizing words or words that trivialize the problems.
  • Try to get coverage in Indian language newspapers. Invite their reporters for events. Provide them press releases to use even if they cannot attend. Actively seek reporters/ writers of Indian language papers to write general articles included. Help them using various ways (as discussed earlier) so that they can write more effective and useful articles.
  • Appreciate the problems of translating and abbreviating study reports/ research-related and find ways to dispense more balanced information on such studies. Directly counter/ debunk wrong information when talking to reporters or addressing gatherings.

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In conclusion

This two-part blog entry provides the highlights of what I learned from my study; I have not commented on many other interesting aspects like article attractiveness, readability, and retention of content. I consider the data presented above sufficient as a starting point to act. Of course, all my work was based on articles available free online and anyone interested can gather and study such articles, and draw their own conclusions and suggestions.

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References

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Dementia Home Care in India: a framework to understand it, and suggestions for caregivers and volunteers

As an ex-caregiver who tries to help other caregivers, I continue to be dismayed by how unprepared and unsupported families are through years of exhausting and heart-breaking dementia caregiving. Many families never get a diagnosis. Even those who get a diagnosis rarely get a realistic picture of how much they need to plan, what changes they will have to make in their lives, and how absent systemic support systems are.

Again and again, I find families clueless about the deterioration dementia brings. They do not know that dementia will keep worsening and that the person will become almost fully dependent. They have not registered that they will be using more and more of their time and money and energy for care. They often think dementia as memory problems; they do not know the person’s abilities will keep reducing. This will go on for years, and during this they will see the person deteriorate in heart-breaking ways. They start this journey unprepared, with no one holding their hands.

Almost all dementia care in India happens at home. Advice given to caregivers assumes many things about what families can afford and the time they have for caregiving. Families do not get a realistic picture for effective planning. They remain unaware of many potential problems. Possibly the advisers themselves do not understand the overwhelming and prolonged nature of care. And advisers do not appreciate that 24×7 home care differs from a day job of a trained professional who is part of a multi-disciplinary team. So a lot of their well-meaning advice is impractical because, though good in itself, the advice does not fit the family’s care context.

The fact is, dementia awareness and support in India is so poor that family caregivers have to create their own group of supporters. They have to plan for dementia caregiving and also for self-care. They have to plan finances for a marathon stretch of increased costs and reduced incomes. They have to see how to take out the required time and energy for years of care. They have to prepare for the emotional journey of caring and their stress and fatigue. They have to appreciate the limitations of the systems and support around them, and have realistic expectations. And all such planning has to be done early, because they will not be able to do much planning once they are submerged in intense caregiving.

Home care for someone with dementia is not a simple short-duration activity. Care happens for several years, and in the context of the culture and society and the family’s other obligations and desires. Many long-term decisions are made. We need to view dementia home care as part of this framework in order to understand and plan it better. We have to appreciate the limitations and then seek practical answers.

I have been mulling over this for a while now, and recently I put together my thoughts on such a framework along with some suggestions for caregivers and volunteers. Alas, there are far too many problems, and very few solutions or suggestions. I am not sure how much my presentation will help viewers, but it will surely give them something to think about. Maybe it will prompt families to derive practical approaches for their care situations. Maybe volunteers will find better ways to support families. You can view the presentation below, or view the presentation directly at Slideshare if the player below does not load properly.

Also, some similar posts and pages, and some resources:

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Dementia Awareness in India: What level is it at?

Many people working for dementia are sure that awareness is much better now — but they only have anecdotal data and personal impressions to support it. My own impression about dementia awareness in India is less optimistic. I think awareness has improved in pockets, and stayed the same or got worse in others. I also think that a lot of misinformation is spreading along with information, and that the negative impact of misinformation could partially offset the positive impact of good information.

This post presents my initial thoughts on how we can understand where our society stands in terms of awareness of dementia.

For a while now I’ve been asking around for are surveys or studies to gauge awareness levels in India. I have not found any recent studies that measure awareness. I have also been told that surveys cost money and resources. (One study I found was way back in 2009, the link of which is at the end of this post).

India is a country of diversities. There are rural areas that are difficult to access, there are urban slums, and there are luxurious apartment complexes in metros. There are the highly educated, the functionally literate, and the illiterates. India has many languages, and though many Indians know more than one language, many are not literate or fluent in more than one. There are abjectly poor persons living with extremely poor infrastructure, and there are advantaged persons who don’t even know that many families struggle for basic sanitation and clean drinking water.

How can any study, any research, get at least enough data from all these segments to obtain a sense of what is going on? Here are some initial thoughts I have.

Firstly, awareness is not important in itself. It is not an isolated goal. Awareness is important because it affects coping and behavior when a problem is faced. When there is zero awareness, persons facing the problem do nothing about it. When a society is fully aware about a problem, the solutions are so clear and available that we don’t have to bother about awareness at all–awareness is all-pervading.

Our concerns and actions to improve awareness and outcomes are because we are in between these two extremes.

Everyone working in the dementia domain agrees that awareness is very important. But people differ in how they perceive the current status, the direct efforts being made to improve awareness, and how effective they feel they are in helping families cope with dementia.

We need a realistic idea of the current levels and the progress in the level of awareness, because:

  • Awareness data helps volunteers know the effect of their work. It helps them to channel their efforts better to achieve what they want.
  • Awareness data provides a better basis for attracting volunteers and funds.
  • Awareness data can be combined with data on diagnosis and family experiences to get better insights on how to get more early diagnosis, and to make life better for families living with dementia

Surveys on awareness require a lot of resources and are time-consuming and therefore cannot be conducted very frequently. However, in between exhaustive surveys, other indicators may be used to assess the trends in awareness levels more regularly. Broadly, I propose that analysts consider the following:

  • Information-seeking behavior of families facing problems. As awareness increases, information-seeking from reliable sources should increase. Trends in information-seeking behavior are one indication of trends in awareness.
  • Available information, its quantity, quality, and reach in relation to various segments of society. Awareness in any society cannot exist without information being available. Hence, the trends in information availability can point to the trends in awareness.

Below I explore these in some more detail.

Information-Seeking Behavior

When someone shows dementia symptoms, the person and the family may respond in different ways.

  • The symptoms are ignored (old age), or feared to be stigmatizing and hidden
  • The symptoms are not seen as “dementia” and information is sought from sources that are unreliable
  • Information is sought from sources where these is chance of getting reliable help, like doctors, helplines, organizations related to dementia, searching books and the Internet, memory clinics, etc.

Data on some information-seeking behavior is free and publicly available (such as google trends, Wikipedia page reads) or is available as statistics issued by some organizations (like helpline usage, memory clinic visit records, website usage statistics of larger websites). This data can be studied for trends and also correlated to demographic factors.

For example, an analyst can see if a website’s visitors come more from one geographic region or another, or how they grow. Or they can see if the Google searches for a certain phrase have been going up over time. Or if a helpline is getting more calls now than earlier.

Availability of Information

Awareness cannot increase without correct information being available in multiple forms. If awareness has to be increased in a segment of society, persons in that segment need to have access to correct information in formats that they can understand and use. Even if information is available, persons may not think of hearing/ watching/ reading it, and information may have to be “pushed” on them in order to make them realize it is useful.

There are many possible forms of information. For example, printed information–articles in newspapers and magazines, books and comics, pamphlets, flyers. Information broadcasted over radio and TV ads and programs. Entertainment, such as movies, street plays. Programs conducted for information, like awareness talks at community centres, walks, etc. And online sources like websites, apps, forums.

There are also many other resources that can be approached, like doctors, helplines, memory clinics.

We can view pieces of information using various criteria, such as:

  • Is the information in a format that the target audience can understand? What does it assume in terms of literacy, language and comprehension skills, accessibility, etc.?
  • Is the information reliable and useful?
  • Is it just a teaser, or is it practical and usable? Is it clear or can it be misleading?
  • Is the information presented in a way that the target audience will be exposed to it naturally (like radio or TV ads and programs, movies, street plays)? Or is it only visible to those actively seeking it (like buying books or approaching a doctor)? How much effort does someone need to put in to get the information?
  • How visible and persistent is the information?
  • Is the information free or does it cost something (like a paid workshop)? Is it affordable, and cost-effective?
  • Does the information reinforce stigmatizing depictions of dementia? Does it contain confusing or wrong information on symptoms, progression, treatment, etc.? (If so, the effect is negative)

Such criteria can help us gauge the usefulness (or harm) of pieces of information in terms of impact on awareness.

Take, for example, a printed English newspaper article. A printed article may be visible for only one day (when the paper is new), is of use only if seen by an English-reader who spots it, reads it, and understands it. The percolation of information through such an information piece is different from that of a TV ad played between a popular program or a radio ad aired between news programs or songs. Or consider a memory clinic; though this is a good source of authentic information it is used only by persons who know they should go there and who have the time and resources to visit it.

We can combine the estimated usefulness of pieces of information (a quality measure) with the quantity of information available (and how it is growing). This will give us a sense of how these facilitate improved awareness.

Fortunately, a lot of data is available free online, such as detailed demographic data, available articles, readership and viewership trends, income and spending patterns, projections for these, and so on. Some armchair analysis using public data, models, and maybe small surveys, can therefore provide insight about dementia awareness level and trends. This could supplement larger studies, but even otherwise, it would help us understand ground realities and gaps better. Volunteers can then decide where to focus efforts.

I may explore this in future posts. Meanwhile, I would love to hear your thoughts on this post. Please do share with others who may be interested.

Referred to above: The only paper I have found so far, a much-quoted paper by Dr. Amit Dias et al on treatment gap, based on surveys in Goa and published in 2009: Closing the treatment gap for dementia in India

I have several blog entries where I discuss awareness, but here are some links to posts that could be particularly relevantif you found the above discussion interesting:

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Dementia prevalence, life expectancy, population pyramids, and playing around with graphs and scattered numbers; also, some sundry thoughts

I recently chanced on a newspaper article lauding Bollywood for spreading awareness on “rare” diseases, lumping in this so-called “rare” category genuinely rare diseases like progeria with widely prevalent problems like Alzheimer’s Disease. And I thought, maybe this reporter did not know about Alzheimer’s before watching “Black”, but surely we cannot call a disease rare just because we may not have heard of it!

See, poor awareness about a disease/ syndrome is not the same as low prevalence. A disease may be occurring often and remaining undiagnosed, or perhaps people do not talk about the diagnosis because there is a stigma attached to it; that does not make the disease “rare”, though awareness definitely needs to be spread.

There’s a tragedy happening when a commonly prevalent disease remains undiagnosed because of poor awareness. We add to that tragedy if we call the disease rare, because to call it “rare” diminishes alertness about a disease. Most of us may read an article on a rare disease with curiosity, but assume it is exotic and only something very few get (always “others”, never we or our close ones). Labeling something rare seems (to me) counterproductive to awareness drives.

The newspaper report I mention above started me in a rather disjointed gathering of diverse data and numbers that I have not yet managed to organize mentally, but hey, this is a blog, not a paper, so here goes…

Let’s first knock off the bundling of progeria and Alzheimer’s into one group. Wikipedia’s page on progeria informs me that there are 80 cases worldwide for progeria (1 per 8 million live births). On the other hand, the WHO and ADI report of 2012 (Dementia: A Public Health Priority) estimates dementia cases worldwide as 35.6 million (35,600,000) which is 0.5% of the world population, and most of these cases are either pure Alzheimer’s or mixed dementias (that include Alzheimer’s).

Also, on what is “rare” as a disease, here are some definitions (from this site )

  • A disease or disorder is defined as rare in Europe when it affects fewer than 1 in 2000.
  • A disease or disorder is defined as rare in the USA when it affects fewer than 200,000 Americans at any given time.

I hope that finishes off my explanation of the error in using the “rare” label for dementia or Alzheimer’s.

Onwards, then, to other thoughts on numbers and stuff.

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Down memory lane, one year of gathering caregiver perspectives, caregiver voices

I’m an asocial and risk-averse person, but I can be bloody-minded if convinced that something needs to be done, and so I sometimes start projects that defy sanity. That’s how I plunged into a rather hefty project around a year ago, self-directed, without any pressure from anyone but my own stubborn nature. It happened when I got sick of rummaging for dementia care stuff directly applicable in India, because though the Internet abounds with information on dementia, and also on its care, and there are plenty of books, too, most of these are designed for a different cultural context.

I wanted more tips that could be used here, in India, with terminology I could relate to, more examples, more situations. Stuff that took into account the abysmal awareness about dementia in India, and the lack of institutional support. Stuff that suggested resources available in India, or in Indian languages. Most of all, I missed the voices of fellow caregivers–their stories, their struggles, their successes. The community that remains hidden in shadows.

And so I created the Dementia Care Notes site.

Of course, there was no way I could say that anyone would bother to visit my new site. How would people know it existed? Why would they bother to read it? But hey, even if I lost some time and effort and money, at least I wouldn’t get this dirty helpless feeling that I hadn’t tried…

It was in September last year that I started planning an entire site dedicated to family caregivers looking after dementia patients in India. Not just a section on a website, not merely a few pages or a pamphlet, but a full-fledged site. I drafted out the core set of pages, and then bought the domain and made the site live. The website now has over 90 pages, all full of information about dementia and its care, resources in India, books, DVDs, presentations, and…plenty of interviews.

As of today, the Dementia Care Notes site has twenty-three detailed interviews, eighteen of them being interviews of caregivers: List of caregiver and volunteer interviews.

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Not Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s? Then why’s there a problem?

When my mother started facing balance problems, I had no clue what was happening, but I’d heard of Parkinson’s and that was my first suspicion. When she started facing memory loss, the only disease I knew related to that was Alzheimer’s. I didn’t know much about either Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s, but I’d heard these names, and seen articles on them. I’d made a quick mental note saying I may need to know more about these problems some day. I’d even kept some cuttings “carefully” for later; I wonder where they went 🙂

As it happens, my mother’s diagnosis was neither Parkinson’s nor Alzheimer’s. We went through multiple neurologists before I was given a documented diagnosis, and I took pains to memorize the phrases in it so that I could tell anyone who was interested the exact problem.
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The turning point, and becoming proactive

Thanks to Internet,  I was reasonably informed about how to communicate with my mother, and how to help her. I was also lucky that I’d managed to get a full-time person for her after our move. A one-bedroom apartment for my mother and the full-time attendant was set up specifically so that it was both roomy and safe and exactly met all that my mother and her attendant could need.

Yet, things were still not working out. There were episodes of rages and accusations by my mother, and attendants were unhappy, too. I would spend hours with my mother, and most of these went listening to her unhappiness and complaints about the attendant, about me, about what visitors said, or things she imagined because of what she’d been told by visitors or had imagined in her deluded, jumbled-up reality. I would end up spending most of my time calming her, but soon after, she was back to her agitated state. Sometimes, she was depressed because she did not understand why she was not “normal”. There were days she seemed happy and calm, and I noticed these were days when she spent a more structured day with less interactions or stimulus.
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Care for everyone but a dementia patient…

Time to start writing about the changes I tried to make in my life to handle caregiving better. This is going to be another set of mistakes laid bare on the page, sigh, braided together with spots that worked…

But before I start examining and describing what I did,  let me step back to look at some basic premises.

A lot of people I meet say that everyone makes adjustments to take care of elders, and I think what they wonder is why talk/ write about something everyone does–surely, it could not be that different for dementia patients.

So I’ll start this phase of my blogging by describing my caregiving experience for my father, who was absolutely sharp mentally right to the end. Sharp, articulate, and very aware, even on the last day of his life.
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A common loneliness…

For the last few days, I’ve been recalling some of the challenges posed in caregiving because of my mother’s condition. These were places where her memory loss and confusion resulted in her saying and doing things that hurt her and people around her. They caused me repeated embarrassment and anger and frustration, they made me withdraw from people around me and effectively isolated me, and they made her fall ill and hurt herself. Most of the time, though I had begun to register that she was acting out of confusion (and not because she wanted to be mean), I had no effective way to reach out to her or to explain to others or generally make things better. There was an overall sense of helplessness and inevitability that I experienced.

I’d like to wrap up this part of my recollections by sharing her obvious sense of insecurity and isolation.

There were many incidents in those difficult years that showed how insecure my mother had started feeling. In addition to making me promise again and again that I would take care of her, she made it a point to complain to everyone about me, and when they talked tough to me, she’d tell me, “See, did you see what he said? You must do your duty properly.” Essentially, she was using these complaints to make sure I didn’t forget or neglect my duty. Earlier, I’d seen it as manipulation done out of dislike for me, but over time I realized this to be a twisted thinking of hers to get what she wanted.

She felt that if others were always telling me what my duty was, she would be safer.
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Ignorance is not bliss…

After making yesterday’s post, memories have been flooding me. Memories of how people I knew well, good, well-respected, educated and informed, religious people would say things that could only be called cruel to my mother, because they refused to understand my mother’s ataxia and dementia, and how these affected her. People whom I repeatedly requested to change the way they talked to her, but they refused, claiming I was exaggerating things or just exercising “control” over my mother. That I was not doing enough to make my mother okay…

I could probably exhaust a month’s worth of entries over these memories, but I’ll select just a few and write of them today.

Take this elderly gentleman in our neighborhood, who was mentally sharp even though in his eighties, and he loved meeting people. He could remember everyone’s name and face and life history and hold interesting (well, almost) conversations with people. He would drop in to meet my mother sometimes. For some reason, it bugged him to see that she was not socializing with people, and stayed in the apartment all the time.
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Day 2 and warming up to the blogging

Yesterday I thought I’d do a neat fit-into-boxes categorization of a month’s worth of blog entries, but I found I was too scattered in my thinking, so I’m letting my instinct take over till I get back my “blogging fingers.”

Here, for example, is one thing that bothers me…

Sometimes, when I tell others (non-caregivers) of the stress that dementia caregivers face, or of the challenges posed in looking after dementia patients, they semi-shrug and say, “Oh, we know the problems of looking after elders–doesn’t everyone! But our parents brought us up, so it is our duty.” Some even say, “You think those people have it tough because of their parents? You should see my parents! Really, my parents are the limit!”
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Ramblings on love, hate, and a life worth living

February has been a mixed month for my mother, the most painful part being when she went down with fever but could not tell us where the pain was. Being a dementia patient in an advanced stage, she cannot communicate her problems to us, which means we have to be detectives. Much investigation and deduction was attempted, without success, medication given to control the fever. Two days into the problem, she broke and swallowed a tooth–ouch! She broke another tooth again, the next day. Ergo, a tooth infection. Fever’s under control, and a dentist was requested to make a home visit to assess her dental status 🙂 A major project is now to be planned–a trip to the dentist to remove another tooth that is tethering on a breakdown, and to clean up the stuff left behind by the two not-so-neatly broken teeth. That she is fully bedridden makes the challenge more, well, challenging. Ah, well.

But what’s prompted me to write this blog is something quite unrelated, actually, a few unrelated things, that happened these last two weeks.

Firs, I’d like to share a memory dating around seven years ago. Seven years ago, I was still naive about dementia and how it affects people, still thinking increased memory loss was like losing ten keys a day instead of one. My mother was in her own denial mode, unwilling to admit to any memory loss. The world around her (as I can see in retrospect) bewildered her, and she was not going to tell anyone that. She was a fighter, she was. Often I saw her writing with a fierce concentration in a diary, and snap it close when I entered her room. One day, she left it open near her breakfast tray, and there it was, written with a red pen, written so angrily that the pen had torn through the paper. There were many broken sentences on the page, and I stopped short when I saw my name. She had written that she hated me, written it again and again and again, and written about others she hated, and at the end, there was: I hate hate hate the world.
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behavior of concern

A few days ago, I had the opportunity to discuss “Understanding Challenging Behaviour” with a number of professionals involved (or about to be involved) in dementia caregiving.

It got me thinking 🙂

There is, of course, no shortage of difficult/ challenging behavior when you are caring for a dementia patient. The nature of the disease keeps the patient disoriented about time and space, keeps memories disjointed or wrongly connected, affects even basic aspects like identity and interpreting the surroundings. A patient may not recognize a close relative, let alone a carer he/ she sees every day. Everything to a patient can be a challenge, and in response to this, the patient may react with withdrawal or aggression or any of the range of ‘challenging’ behaviors.

Then, there is this concept of  “behavior of concern” which is rather simple:  not every strange/ not-normal behavior of a dementia patient needs to worry us. Every model on dementia caregiving tells us we need to focus on behaviors with serious/ unacceptable consequences. Simply put, a behavior of concern is one that upsets or harms the patient or the persons (or community) around the patient. The rest of strange behaviors can, well, be set aside 🙂
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